COMMUNITY POLICING IN BRAUNSTONE
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HOW IMPARTIAL ARE THE LEICESTER POLICE FORCE

 BRAUNSTONE COMMUNITY POLICING

 

Leicestershire's chief constable Matt Baggott

 

Our legal requirement is to promote racial equality or would give the impression they are not acting impartially. The local police have failed Braunstone ethnic minority’s they have failed to investigate complaints of racial harassments and racial violence.

 

  1. A Scots Braunstone resident reported criminal acts of racial harassment.
  2. 6 July 2004 reported   to the local Braunstone police no action was taken.
  3. The Scots resident went to 3 different police stations, the Beaumont Leys police station investigated and a statement was taken in November 2004 five months later.
  4. The Chief Constable of Leicestershire Constabulary Mr. Matthew Baggott who also chairs the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) race and diversity business area. Said he was sorry that the Scots resident had a dispute with the BCA directors.
  5. The Scots resident seen by two senior police officers who informed him that the police had made mistakes he apologised on behalf of the police several times.
  6. The police did not follow their own police procedures (Centrex Developing Policing Excellence), their own advice that is on the Leicester Constabulary Police Website, nor did the police follow the recommendations of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report.
  7.  Another English (Caribbean) reported he was being racially harassed by the ex vice chair of the local labour party and BCA directors over 3 months ago the police have not contacted him to date.
  8.  A resident reported to the local Braunstone police two Labour supporters/ BCA directors for making racist comments in public regarding the Asians, Caribbean’s and Scots Braunstone residents. The resident was under the impression that the police had a duty to investigate, despite the residents strong protests the police refused to investigate. The resident was in turn arrested by the Braunstone police for protesting the BCA was a racist organisation.
  9. The ex vice chair of the local labour party and BCA Director  can make a complaint of harassment to the local Braunstone police on a Friday, the police can come to her house on the following Monday take a statement and arrest the Braunstone resident (within two hours)  for telling her the BCA was a racist organisation.

 

Paddy Doyley, this is what I have experienced by the Leicester police those are extracts of my letter I have sent to the IPCC

 

03 January 2005

 

Ref: 2004/007979

 

Dear Sir

 

In your letter dated 30 November 2004 you stated the police will contact me in due course regarding my complaint. I have received a letter from a Superintendent CE Thomas Enderby dated 14 December 2004, who informs me that he, has forwarded my letter to Inspector Orton the local Commander of Braunstone police station, who will appoint an officer to deal with my complaint.

 

I wish to formally make the following complaint

as follows.

 

To date Mr Orton has not contacted me or any other officer.  I’d like to ask the question, what kind of police force have we got in Leicester? I must strongly protest that the police are deliberately using tactics to protect two of the racist i.e. Gwen Abraham and Anne Glover for the following reasons.

 

Anne Glover was the only witness for the police in a criminal case and Gwen Abraham is a Key witness in another criminal case, it’s clear that the police deliberately do not want to act on my complaint of racial harassment until after Gwen Abraham has appeared as a police witness. 

 

This is a political decision to save those people because they have political friends, this I find deplorable in today’s society, I further question why the Braunstone police can act on Gwen Abrahams statement within two hours, but when it come to me I am treated differently . I further have to ask the question are the police being racist when it comes to dealing with the ethnic minority’s here in Braunstone.  I further ask you that a public inquiry be set up as to the conduct of the Leicester police force. The Leicester police have not followed their own procedures (I have taken this of the following website regarding the Code of Practice on reporting and recording racist incidents in response to recommendation 15 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report.

 

 1.5, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 2.2, 2.3, 3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 3.10,

 

Patrick Doyley

 

Ex Elected Braunstone Community Assocation (BCA) Director. 

 

Paddy here is mine I seem to have the same problem with the Braunstone police as you example of a letter to the Independent Police Complaints

Commission (IPCC) January 2005

 

Dear xxxx

 

I am extremely angry and upset set that the police

can treat me in such a fashion and be allowed to get away with it, considering that I first made a complaint in June 2003 regarding the police, yet I am certainly no further forward then I was last year. Why do I have to put up with the police delay tactics, why are they not held accountable, why are they allowed, to be blunt take the piss and drag it out and hope the issues will go away? 

 

Let me give you an example; I receive a letter from the Leicester Chief Constable around 2 January 2004 regarding (a victims of racist incident survey) which stated that I should return the questionnaire by the 11th January 2004.   

 

Yet when it come to dealing with the public who pay their wages it’s a different matter. I state here and now the police should have charged my racial harassers and tormentors they have no legal reason for not following the law.

 

For the record it’s clear the police are deliberately protecting their key witness because of the political issues it will create in Braunstone. If you allow the police this delay looking into the issues until one of the offenders had given evidence on behalf of the police then you have done what the police wanted, the police have no intention to see me or any other resident of Braunstone to sort the issues out until the ex vice chair of the labour party has given her evidence to the court.

 

I ask you to take notice I strongly protest the police have not taken any action in regard to those people. I bitterly  resent the police have denied my Human and Civil Rights and not want one department who I have wrote to does anything, so much for being British pass the buck?

 

Ray Ross

Ex Elected BCA Director

 

The Leicester Mercury article on the 14 December 2004, MAN ARRESTED AFTER RACE-HATE DOCUMENTARY INQUIRY Police investigating a TV documentary which looked at the extent of racism in the British National Party (BNP) are today questioning an 11th person. The 24-year-old Leicester man was arrested yesterday on suspicion of incitement to commit racial hatred following the BBC programme Secret Agent. His arrest comes a day after a 70-year-old Brighton man was arrested by West Yorkshire Police on suspicion of the same offence and later released on bail, pending further inquiries.

 

The Braunstone Bugle would have to agree with, Mr Griffin's claim that his arrest on suspicion of incitement to commit racial hatred was "politically motivated". Here in Leicester it’s the opposite the ex vice chair of the local Leicester labour party and a Braunstone Community Association (BCA) director has not been charged with any racial offences. Despite of a number of victims complaining to the local Braunstone police, that they had experienced a number of labour party members and BCA directors who have been racially harassing and threatening them.

 

                          

 Leicestershire's Chief Constable Matt Baggott

 

29 July 2004 Leicestershire's chief constable Matt Baggott Matt Baggott vowed to sack any police officer who joins the British National Party or any far right group. Our legal requirement is to promote racial equality or would give the impression they are not acting impartially. Mr Baggott, who is ACPO spokesman on race issues and has been involved in drafting the policy "We are making the boundaries absolutely clear our duty is to promote racial equality”.

 

The local police have failed the ethnic minority’s they have failed to investigate complaints of racial harassments and racial violence.

 

If you are dissatisfied with your local police service, you have a right to complain contact the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) at http://www.ipcc.gov.uk

 

PACE and protection of human rights

 

Members of the public are entitled to expect certain standards from its police officers and from other members of society. Everyone may expect that their rights as individuals or as a lawful group will be upheld. These rights fall into two categories, firstly an individual's expectations of the service they will receive from the police and secondly an individual's rights in law.

 

The public has a right to expect their police officers to behave in a manner that protects each individual's basic rights within the law. They expect help when they require it, and fair treatment in their dealings with police officers and justice. These basic rights are a matter of common courtesy.

  

  1. A Scots Braunstone resident reported criminal acts of racial harassment
  2. 6 July 2004 reported   to the local Braunstone police no action was taken
  3. The Scots resident went to 3 different police stations, the Beaumont Leys police station investigated and a statement was taken in November 2004 five months later.
  4. The Chief Constable of Leicestershire Constabulary Mr. Matthew Baggott who also chairs the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) race and diversity business area. Said he was sorry that the Scots resident had a dispute with the BCA directors.
  5. The Scots resident seen by two senior police officers who informed him that the police had made mistakes he apologised on behalf of the police several times.
  6. The police did not follow their own police procedures (Centrex Developing Policing Excellence), their own advice that is on the Leicester Constabulary Police Website, nor did the police follow the recommendations of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report.
  7. Another English (Caribbean) reported he was being racially harassed by the ex vice chair of the local labour party and BCA directors over 3 months ago the police have not contacted him to date.

  8. A resident reported to the local Braunstone police two Labour supporters/ BCA directors for making racist comments in public regarding the Asians, Caribbean’s and Scots Braunstone residents. The resident was under the impression that the police had a duty to investigate, despite the residents strong protests the police refused to investigate. The resident was in turn arrested by the Braunstone police for protesting the BCA was a racist organisation.

  9. The ex vice chair of the local labour party and BCA director can make a complaint of harassment to the local Braunstone police on a Friday, the police can come to her house on the following Monday take a statement and arrest the Braunstone resident (within two hours)  for telling her the BCA was a racist organisation.

 

 Example from a Scots resident from Braunstone:

 

I am angry reading that the police can arrested members of a political party for racial offences when the police ignore racial offences here in Braunstone, is it because the offenders are either Labour party members or directors of the Braunstone Community Association (BCA) . The Government funded the BCA to regenerate Braunstone, with the elections near it would not look good to arrest those racist. It would not look good for the labour party or Patricia Hewitt MP with her involvement with the BCA, nor the Archdeacon of Leicester OBE, what about the victims?

 

At a BCA board meeting on the 28 April 2004 a BCA director threatened to hit me over the head with baseball bat and used racial language. I put a complaint into the local Braunstone police about racial harassment, I wrote to Mr Baggott with my concerns about the police impartiality. The reason for this I reported another BCA director (a member of the Labour party) who threatened to get the heavies on me in 2002 to the local Braunstone police, this was never investigated. Considering Mr Baggott is a spokesman for (ACPO) on race issues and involved in policy making, I am at a lost why Mr Baggott responded that he was sorry I had disrepute with the BCA. That is not very sensitive considering the crime was recorded a racial harassment, nor is does it say much considering Mr Baggott is the police spokesman on race issues

 

I had another occasion to reported racial harassment to the Braunstone police on 6 July 2004 by a number of BCA directors, (one particular incident where the BCA board cleared the director of any racial abuse only to be forced to admit the racial abuse at the Leicester Racial Equality Council some months later). I had to contact 3 police stations because no police office took any statement. Eventually I made a statement in November 2004 the officer said it was racially aggravated intentional harassment. 5 months later the police apologised and say they have made mistakes. Where is the commitment and duty of the police to promote racial equality?

 

The Rt Rev Tim Stevens, Bishop of Leicester Church of England, said: "the BBC exposure demonstrated that significant numbers of leaders of the British National Party (BNP) have deeply racist views.

 

The Rt Rev Tim Stevens, Bishop of Leicester and Church of England should have a word with the ven Richard Atkinson Archdeacon of Leicester OBE, the BCA Independent Chair who took part in a BCA Board meeting on the 28 January 2004 the chair accepted a director had made racist remarks. Took part in a board meeting, the BCA board stated that there was no substance to the racial incident. Months later the ven Richard Atkinson Archdeacon of Leicester OBE, the BCA Independent Chair and the

BCA chief executive Keith Beaumont acknowledged it was a racist incident, the chair has stated the director who was racial abusing another director was said in jest then stated it was a joke. Leicester Racial Equality Council did not find it amusing nor did the victim; again a man of the church shows no sensitivity on racial issues. The chair did not investigate the racial incident, but to solve the problem the Archdeacon of Leicester OBE, told the board he was minded to remove the director who was racially abuse from the BCA board for complaining about racial discrimination and the board agreed.

 

Example from a black Caribbean Englishman from Braunstone:

 

I went up to Braunstone police station Leicester and told them I was being racially harassed, by some Braunstone Community Association (BCA) directors one being an ex vice chair of the local labour party. I was informed that it was a dispute with the BCA. I had to go to a number of police stations the last one being Beaumont Leys this has been over three months.

 

Ms Patricia Hewitt MP contacted the police on the ex vice chair behalf, yet she ignores me, I believe this is the reason why the police have not taken any action. The police have not investigated this racial incident in over 3 months they have not contact me. I am also aware the police have took over six months regarding another Braunstone resident who has been racially  harassed by the same ex vice chair of the local labour party. Other BCA directors are involved yet they are still on the BCA board, the problem maybe that the police and the BCA directors are on the same committees, and Patricia Hewitt MP is very much involved.

 

I am aware the ex vice chair of the labour party and BCA director reported to the local a Braunstone police station, a resident for telling her the BCA was a racist organisation on a Friday. On the following Monday the police went to her house and took a statement and the resident was arrested two hours later. Why did the Braunstone police not deal with in the same way as the ex vice chair of the labout party/ BCA director?    

http://www.braunstoneskilled.g2gm.com

 

 

Example from Braunstone Resident who reported a racist crime:

 

Another Braunstone resident reported to the local Braunstone police two Labour supporters/ BCA directors for making racist comments in public regarding the Asians, Caribbean’s and Scots Braunstone residents. The resident was under the impression that the police had a duty to investigate, despite the residents strong protests the police refused to investigate. The resident was in turn arrested by the Braunstone police for protesting the BCA was a racist organisation.

 

WHY ARE THE BRAUNSTONE POLICE

NOT FOLLOWING THIS CODE

Code of Practice on reporting and recording racist incidents in response to recommendation 15 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report

 

1.5 The Code of Practice is applicable to all statutory, voluntary and community groups involved in the multi-agency reporting and recording of racist incidents.

 

1.6 There are many "players" who may have a role in dealing with racist incidents and standard procedures are needed if effective inter-agency action is to be taken. The agencies involved will vary from area to area, but there are certain core agencies. They include the police and local authorities, in particular Housing and Education Departments, social services, Victim Support, and may include race equality councils, multi-agency panels, religious organisations, Citizen's Advice Bureaux, tenants' associations and other community groups. Though the involvement of some agencies is perceived to be indispensable, this is not intended to exclude any other agency or organisation. All those who participate in local arrangements developed to facilitate reporting racist incidents should sign up to this Code

 

1.7 The aim of the Code is to provide guidelines for local agencies to establish effective procedures for the reporting and recording of racist incidents. Local needs demand local solutions and it is hoped that this Code will assist agencies in coming up with solutions that most effectively assist in the reduction of racist crime and disorder. Different service providers will have different information needs and a differing range of options open to them, such as offering support to victims, legal advice or action against the perpetrators. An example of this is local housing authorities, which may be called upon to take action through the civil courts against tenants who racially harass their neighbours.

 

1.8 The Code should help to ensure that action is taken to help the victims of racism and to deal with perpetrators appropriately.

 

1.9 The Code focuses on procedures for reporting and recording racist incidents in a multi-agency context, not the investigation of incidents or crimes which is primarily the responsibility of the police. Guidance for the police on the investigation of racist incidents is given in the ACPO Action Guide to Identifying and Combating Hate Crime (Breaking the Power of Fear and Hate).

Recommendation 12 of the report of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry was that the definition of a racist incident should be:

"any incident which is perceived to be racist by the victim or any other person."

 

2.2 This definition has already been adopted by the police and several other agencies and it is commended to all. It is a simpler and clearer version of the ACPO definition that was previously used by most agencies. It is vital that in establishing a comprehensive system for the reporting and recording of racist incidents, the different agencies involved are working to the same definition.

 

2.3 In his Action Plan on the Report, the Home Secretary said that the Home Office would "ensure that the Inquiry's simplified definition of a racist incident is universally adopted by the police, local government and other relevant agencies".

2.4 The definition of a racist incident that should be used by all agencies is that recommended by the Report of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry. The purpose of this definition is not to prejudge the question of whether a perpetrator's motive was racist or not: that may have to be proved if, for instance, the perpetrator is to be charged with a racially aggravated offence. The purpose of the definition is rather to ensure that investigations take full account of the possibility of a racist dimension to the incident and that statistics of such incidents are collected on a uniform basis.

 

3. GUIDELINES ON THE USE OF THIS DEFINITION OF A RACIST INCIDENT

 

3.1 Recommendation 13 of the Stephen Lawrence Report was:

"That the term "racist incident" must be understood to include crimes and non-crimes in policing terms. Both must be reported, recorded and investigated with equal commitment."

 

3.2 Agencies should be committed to recording both crimes and non-crimes as racist incidents.

 

3.3 Racist incidents are not recorded only to provide statistics at a national level, nor even to provide statistics at a local level, although these are obviously useful outcomes of recording. But recording incidents also allows the victim to be offered support and enables intelligence to be gathered, which will help appropriate preventative measures to be put in place and information to be collected that may help in dealing with the perpetrator/s, and focus resources on areas of need.

 

3.4 Recording racist incidents under the new definition should capture all incidents with a racist element, including low-level harassment and those incidents that are not identifiable offences. The rationale for this is that recording all such incidents allows the police and other agencies to identify tension indicators early on which can be used to prevent further incidents or crimes or can provide useful information if the incidents later escalate to the level of crimes. The aim is to identify underlying trends and build up a picture of racism in the local area. Historically there has been much under-reporting and under-recording of racist incidents. Many incidents are still not reported to the police, though some may be reported to other agencies. Even if crimes are reported, the racist element may not be mentioned.3

 

Examples on recording racist incidents

 

3.5 The examples below refer to cases where the incident or crime occurs in a public place, and investigation is the responsibility of the police. In a case where the incident occurs in a place which is under the control of an employer or service provider, the employer or service provider is obliged to take action in order to comply with the Race Relations Act 1976 (currently being amended to apply to all public services). Thus, for example, if a black woman feels herself to be the subject of racial discrimination at work, this should be dealt with in the first instance by her employer  under equal opportunities policy, although she may of course report any incidents to another agency if she feels more comfortable doing so.

Examples of incidents which provide useful information for the future

 

3.6 An Asian man calls the police because white youths are hanging around outside his house. He perceives their presence as racist and the police therefore fill in a racist incident form. Some time later his windows are smashed. The earlier information about racist incidents may provide useful intelligence to the police in solving the crime.

 

3.7 A teacher overhears a white child calling an Asian child a "Paki". The teacher records this as a racist incident, even though the abused child does not complain to him, and speaks to the child responsible for the abuse. If a more serious incident occurs later on, the teacher has a written record of a previous incident that would allow the subsequent incident not to be dealt with in isolation.

Example of the wider implications of applying the definition of a racist incident

(‘perceived to be racist by the victim or any other person')

 

3.8 The car tyres of a Chinese woman have been slashed. She does not think the incident is racist, but her white neighbour does and reports the matter to the local Race Equality Council. They should record the incident as racist based on the perception of the neighbour, even if the victim disagrees.

Example of an ‘Asian on Asian' racist incident

 

3.9 There is a dispute outside a shop between two groups of youths. One of the young men, of Pakistani origin, is punched in the face by a young man of Indian origin. The victim reports this to the police and tells them that he believes it is a racist incident. The police should record this as a racist incident, since the young man believes that he was attacked because of his ethnic origin.

Example of a ‘White on White' racist incident

 

3.10 Two white males from a community of asylum-seekers visit a local pub shortly after moving into the area. The white barman refuses to serve them, saying that all asylum-seekers are troublemakers. The two men report this incident to a local support group, who should record it as a racist incident, since it is based on stereotyping of the two men according to their ethnic group.

 

Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) Report


30 December 2004
For Immediate Release

Making the New Police Complaints System Work Better

 

The Independent Police Complaints Commission is urging the police service to disclose investigating officers’ reports to complainants and police officers.

The IPCC is committed to making the police complaints system more open and transparent.   It recommends that at the end of an investigation, the complainant should receive a copy of the report, subject to disclosure not causing any harm.

This recommendation forms part of the draft guidance for police forces entitled ‘Making the new police complaints system work better.’

IPCC Chair Nick Hardwick said:  “Before asking the Home Secretary to issue the guidance we are seeking the views of as many people and organisations as possible.  We are sending out thousands of copies of the document to interested parties ranging from community groups to the police service.

“The new system is about opportunities: to increase public confidence in the system; raise the confidence of police officers and police staff in handling complaints; to learn from complaints; to create an open and accessible system; and respect equality and human rights,” he said.

The IPCC guidance also encourages police forces to resolve more complaints locally rather than carrying out a formal investigation.  In order to meet its aim of speeding up the complaints process, the IPCC says that the time to carry out local resolution should be slashed from the current average of 40 days to 28 days.

Effective investigations

Mr Hardwick said: “Where complaints cannot be resolved locally, but have to be investigated, it is essential that the inquiries are carried out in a timely way and are also proportionate if public and police confidence are to be maintained.  The IPCC is giving this a high priority.

“Investigations must be a search for the truth.  Clear terms of reference need to be agreed so that the investigation is not slowed down by the risk of new issues being introduced much later.  If the inquiry is going nowhere, it should stop.  In the past some investigations went on for years.

“During the inquiry, we expect complainants and police staff to be kept updated regularly.   In our own independent investigations we are updating complainants about the progress made each month.  

“At the end of the investigation the report should be disclosed, subject to not causing harm or prejudicing criminal or misconduct proceedings.  If forces decide not to disclose a report, they must keep a record of the reason because a complainant can appeal to us about non-disclosure.

“Making the New Police Complaints System Work Better is on our web site at www.ipcc.gov.uk.  I would urge organisations, the police service and interested members of the public to download it or ring us for a copy on 08453 002 002.  We need comments back by March 17,” he said.

- ends -

Notes for editors:

  1. A leaflet for the public will also be available.  It will be produced in Braille, audio and 14 languages. The draft guidance will be available in Welsh.
  2. The IPCC is developing other supporting information e.g. on local resolution.
  3. The draft was developed in an open way, working with all the police organisations and with a wide range of statutory and voluntary organisations with different perspectives.
  4. The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) is the body with overall responsibility for the new police complaints system in England and Wales. It has the task of increasing public confidence in the system and aims to make complaints investigations more open, timely, proportionate and fair. The 18 IPCC Commissioners guarantee the independence of the IPCC and by law can never have served as police officers.
  5. Since its launch in April 2004 the IPCC has used its powers to carry out 20 independent and 70 managed investigations into the most serious complaints against the police. It has also set new standards for police forces to improve the way the public’s complaints are handled, and upheld 21% of appeals by the public about the way their complaint was dealt with by the local force.
  6. The IPCC is committed to getting closer to the communities it serves.  It has regional offices in Cardiff, Leicestershire, London and Manchester plus a sub office in Wakefield.  Commissioners are regionally based and supported by 72 independent investigators, as well as case workers and specialist support staff.
  7. The IPCC web site is constantly updated at www.ipcc.gov.uk or members of the public can contact the IPCC on 08453 002 002.

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